Wildflowers along the way

image

(Pictured, a trio of trillium, plus a bit of my finger.)

As we make our way through Virginia, as spring slowly overtakes winter, the flora and fauna make me giddy. For years, plant identification has been a passion of mine. It began when I lived at Koinonia Farm and walked the Peace Trail nearly every day. I would draw the leaves and petals in a sketchbook, or try to memorize them if I had none, and then run back to the farm library or office to look for its image and name. After a few years, many of the plants names are buried below consciousness, but out here, seeing them again and re-finding their names is like remembering and reuniting with old friends. Each species makes its appearance, first at the lower elevations, then higher and higher. Not to anthropomorphize, but the flowers encourage, and pull me forward out of curiosity and desire to learn more. Just yesterday a plucky, perfectly formed Jack-in-the-Pulpit perched right on the edge of the trail, and a white-spotted adolescent rabbit crouched in the fog with its eye glowing in fear. Each one is a gift. A passerby can touch all the felty mosses, wonder over the strange fungi, and watch fields of trillium perk as the sun breaks through clouds.

Don’t know if anyone but me will find this interesting, but I have started a list, which will live on this page. I’ll update it every so often, but below I have cut-and-pasted my current inventory. Question marks mean it’s not a certain identification… yet. Enjoy!

Rue anemone?
Wood sorrel
May apple
Spring beauty
Squaw root, a parasite of oaks.
Bedstraw, a sticky grass
Aster?
Periwinkle?
Showy orchis, blooming soon?
Phlox
Vetch
Wild mustards
Flea bane?
Poor man’s pepper
Fire pinks
Spiderwort
Wild bleeding heart
Dutchman’s breeches
Chickweed
Partridgeberry (two flowers needed to make one berry, which has two navels)
Bloodroot (a leaf unfolding wildly folded)
Violets: violet, halberdleaf yellow, white, and bicolor
Trillium, pink and white
Rhododendron aka azalea, Catawba variety blooming late April!
Mountain laurel
Dogwood
Redbud
Oak
Poplar
Hickory?
False strawberry?
Iris, dwarf
Daffodil
Fern
Dandelion
Yarrow
Fireweed
Bluet
Poison ivy
Virginia creeper
Columbine
Trailing arbutus?
Pipsissewa? Or striped wintergreen?
Field pansy?
Bellwort?
Cinquefoil?
Jack in the pulpit
Mosses
Lichens
Grasses

Geranium
Mushrooms

Fauna:
King snake
Rat snake?
Mouse
Mole?
Whitetail deer
Caterpillar
Moth
Rabbit
Owl
Butterfly
Fire salamander, a tiny wild orange
Chipmunk
Squirrel

One Reply to “Wildflowers along the way”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *